Charlie Lynn’s Dirty Dozen: The “Death of Australian Servicemen in Afghanistan” Speech

Extracted from contribution by The Hon. Charlie Lynn MLC to lead the “Death of Australian Servicemen in Afghanistan” Debate, NSW, Parliamentary Debates Legislative Council, 13 September 2012, from page 3, and annotated as applicable:

We must keep the memory of these brave soldiers in our hearts; they have served and testified to the Anzac spirit that forged our nation’s identity.

We must keep the memory of these brave soldiers alive in our hearts. They have served and testified to the Anzac spirit that forged our nation’s identity.

(Premier Barry O’Farrell, Ministerial Statement, “Death of Sapper Rowan Robinson”, NSW Parliamentary Debates, Legislative Assembly, page 2224, 14 June 2011)

Sapper James Thomas Martin was on his first operational deployment as part of the 3rd Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment Task Group. He was a Sapper from the Brisbane-based 2nd Combat Engineer Regiment. Sapper Martin was an intellectual soldier who was a quick learner and adapted well to the Army environment. He was respected by his mates and was considered a loyal friend and comrade. A musically talented individual, he often played his bass guitar for his mates. He was also an avid follower of Australian Rules football.

Sapper James Thomas Martin was on his first operational deployment as part of the 3rd Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment Task Group. He was a Sapper from the Brisbane-based 2nd Combat Engineer Regiment.

[…]

Sapper Martin was an intellectual soldier who was a quick learner and adapted well to the Army environment. He was respected by his mates and was considered a loyal friend and comrade. A musically talented individual, he often played his base guitar for his mates. He was also an avid follower of Aussie Rules.

(Department of Defence Statement announcing the death of Sapper James Thomas Martin)

Private Robert Poate was a member of the 3rd Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment Task Group and was from the 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment [6 RAR] based in Brisbane. Private Poate was known for having outstanding leadership potential, and that led to him completing a promotion course for Corporal in 2011. He will be fondly remembered by his brothers by choice in the 6 RAR as a larrikin and an incredibly professional soldier. Private Poaste had a reputation for creating mischief without getting caught, and was proud of his family, his military service, his Canberra origins, and his red hair, which he vehemently defended as being strawberry blonde.

Private Robert Poate was a member of the 3rd Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment Task Group and was from the 6th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (6 RAR), based in Brisbane, Queensland.

[…]

Private Poate was known for having outstanding leadership potential, which led to him completing a promotion course for Corporal in 2011. He will be fondly remembered by his ‘Brothers by Choice’ in 6 RAR as a larrikin and an incredibly professional soldier. Private Poate had a reputation for creating mischief without getting caught, and was proud of his family, his military service, his Canberran origins, and his red hair, which he vehemently defended as being ‘strawberry blonde’.

(Department of Defence Statement announcing the death of Private Robert Hugh Frederick Poate)

Lance Corporal Mervyn McDonald was born in Carnarvon, Western Australia in 1982. He joined the Army on 31 May 1999 and was posted to the 1st Battalion, the Royal Australia Regiment, the 1 RAR. On completion of his Selection and Training Course and Reinforcement Cycle, Lance Corporal McDonald was posted to the then 4th Battalion, Commando Regiment. Lance Corporal McDonald was quick witted and brought a positive energy to both his unit comrades and all those who served with him. A dedicated and enthusiastic professional solider, he was always willing to come forward with ideas and solutions. He was a highly professional soldier, but his quiet nature and humility meant he always deflected credit back on to fellow members of his company.

Thirty-year old Lance Corporal McDonald was born in Carnarvon, Western Australia in 1982. He joined the Army on 31 May 1999 and was posted to the 1st Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (1 RAR). On completion of his Selection and Training Course and Reinforcement Cycle, Lance Corporal McDonald was posted to the then 4th Battalion (Commando), The Royal Australian Regiment, now the 2nd Commando Regiment, in August 2008. Lance Corporal McDonald was on his sixth tour to Afghanistan.

Lance Corporal McDonald was quick witted and brought a positive energy to both his unit comrades and all those who served with him. A dedicated and enthusiastic professional soldier, he was always willing to come forward with ideas and solutions. He was a highly professional soldier, but his quiet nature and humility meant he always deflected credit back on to fellow members of his Company.

(Department of Defence Statement announcing the death of Lance Corporal Mervyn John McDonald)

Private Nathanael Galagher was born in Wee Waa, New South Wales in 1989. He joined the Army on 22 October 2007 and was posted to the 1st Battalion, the Royal Australian Regiment, the 1 RAR. On completion of his selection and training course and reinforcement cycle, Private Galagher was posted to the 2nd Commando Regiment in November 2011. Private Galagher was on his second tour to Afghanistan. Private Galagher always put 110 per cent in everything he did. He had a “can-do” attitude, always wanting to get the job done and taking everything in his stride. He was an enthusiastic young soldier who was very well respected by his mates from the regiment.

Twenty-three year old Private Galagher was born in Wee Waa, New South Wales in 1989.  He joined the Army on 22 October 2007 and was posted to the 1st Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (1 RAR). On completion of his Selection and Training Course and Reinforcement Cycle, Private Galagher was posted to the 2nd Commando Regiment in November 2011.  Private Galagher was on his second tour to Afghanistan

Private Galagher always put in 110% in every thing he did. He had a ‘can-do’ attitude, always wanting to get the job done and taking everything in his stride. He was an enthusiastic, young soldier who was very well respected by his mates from the Regiment.

(Department of Defence Statement announcing the death of Private Nathanael John Aubrey Galagher)

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