The One Day of the Year: Other Speeches by The Hon. Marie Ficarra MLC

The following is a selection from speeches in the Legislative Council where The Hon. Marie Ficarra has plagiarised other sources.

In the “Tribute to Nancy Wake” debate in the Legislative Council, on 26 August, Ficarra spoke at length.

On 8 August 2011, Arthur Sinodinos, as President of the NSW Division of the Liberal Party, released a statement on the passing of Nancy Wake (who had contested three elections for the Party in the post-war era).

Ficarra:

Nancy will be remembered for her great tenacity and courage during the darkest hours of World War II.

Sindonis Statement

“Nancy will be remembered for her great tenacity and courage during the darkest hours of World War II. Members of the Liberal Party will also remember Nancy as a great servant of our cause. Her loss will be deeply felt,” said Mr Sinodinos.

Ficarra:

Known as the “White Mouse” because of her ability to evade German capture, Nancy coordinated resistance activity and, with the Maquisards she recruited, led attacks on German installations. Nancy is credited with saving thousands of Allied lives through her actions during the war.

Sinodinos Statement

Known as the ‘White Mouse’ because of her ability to evade German capture, Nancy coordinated resistance activity and with the Maquisards she recruited, led attacks on German installations. Nancy is credited with saving thousands of Allied lives through her actions during the war.

Ficarra:

Nancy stood as a candidate at the historic 1949 Federal election. She contested the seat of Barton—near to my heart, in the St George area—which was then held by the Chifley Labor Government’s External Affairs Minister, Dr Herbert “Doc” Evatt, achieving a quite admirable 13 per cent swing. Although Nancy was unsuccessful, the Liberal Party, led by Robert Menzies, won office at a national level at that election for the first time. In 1951, Nancy stood again and further eroded Labor’s margin, with Dr Evatt—by then the Deputy Leader of the Opposition— winning the seat by just 243 votes. So Nancy came extremely close. After a period living overseas, Nancy contested Kingsford Smith for the Liberal Party at the 1966 Federal election. She recorded a 6.9 per cent swing against Labor incumbent Daniel Curtin, but Nancy fell short of winning the seat.

Sinodinos Statement:

Nancy stood as a candidate at the historic 1949 federal election. She contested the Division of Barton, held by the Chifley Labor Government’s External Affairs Minister Dr Herbert ‘Doc’ Evatt, achieving a 13 per cent swing. Although Nancy was unsuccessful, the Liberal Party, led by Robert Menzies, won office at a national level at that election for the first time.

In 1951, Nancy stood again and further eroded Labor’s margin with Dr Evatt, by then the Deputy Leader of the Opposition, winning the seat by just 243 votes.

After a period living overseas, Nancy contested Kingsford Smith for the Liberal Party at the 1966 federal election. Recording a 6.9 per cent swing against Labor incumbent Daniel Curtin, Nancy fell short of winning the seat.

Ficarra:

She was a courageous and decorated wartime hero who was prepared to stand up for the values she believed in and fight for the freedom we enjoy today.

Sinodinos Statement:

NSW Liberal Party President, Arthur Sinodinos AO said “Nancy was inspirational to members of our Party. She was a courageous and decorated war time hero who was prepared to stand up for the values she believed in and fight for the freedom we enjoy today.”

Though Ficarra might be able to fall back on the old saw that to pinch from one source source is plagiarism; to steal from several is research. She also made use of the obituary written for the Sydney Morning Herald by Wake biographer, Peter Fitzsimons:

Ficarra:

As the Nazis crossed the French border, Nancy was angry at the “collaborationists” who advocated living as comfortably as possible with the Nazis—

Fitzsimons:

As the Nazis crossed the French border, Wake was appalled at the ”collaborationistes” who advocated living as comfortably as possible within the Nazi yoke.

Ficarra:

Using her charms and a native cunning, she was so successful with the Resistance that she soon started helping groups of refugees—especially Allied pilots who had been shot down, or Jewish families. Nancy took them to safe houses until they reached the base of the Pyrenees, where other guides would get them across into neutral Spain.

Fitzsimons:

Using her charms and a native cunning, she was so successful with the Resistance that she soon graduated to taking groups of refugees – often downed Allied pilots or Jewish families – between safe houses until they reached the base of the Pyrenees, where other guides would get them across into neutral Spain.

In an adjournment speech earlier this year, Ficarra acknowledged the contribution of noted cancer researcher, Professor Neville Hacker. In her speech, she made unacknowledged use of the Media Statement issued when Hacker was nominated as a NSW finalist for Australian of the Year in 2008:

Ficarra

Professor Hacker has saved the lives of many women with not only his surgical skills but also his psychological understanding of gynaecological cancers. He gives women hope and reassurance at a very difficult and frightening time in their lives. As Director of the Gynaecological Cancer Centre at the Royal Hospital for Women and a noted international authority, Neville travels the world to share his knowledge and skills with other specialists in his field in the hope that they can give women with gynaecological cancer a better outcome. Professor Hacker’s groundbreaking research on ovarian cancer with his team at the Garvan Institute for Medical Research and the Royal Hospital for Women developed genetic profiling that will lead to more specific diagnosis and life-saving early detection for this most silent but deadly killer.

Australian of the Year Media Release

Professor Neville Hacker has saved the lives of many women with his surgical skills and understanding of gynaecological cancers. He gives women hope and reassurance at a very difficult and frightening time in their lives. As Director of the Gynaecological Cancer Centre at the Royal Hospital for Women and noted international authority, Neville travels the world to share his knowledge and skills with other specialists in his field in the hope that they can give women with the disease a better outcome. He is a former president of the International Gynaecological Cancer Society and, as an expert in clinical research, he is the medical adviser to GO Fund. helping that organisation direct basic research towards clinically relevant issues. Neville’s groundbreaking research on ovarian cancer with his team at the Garvan Institute for Medical Research and the Royal has developed genetic profiling which will lead to more specific diagnosis and lifesaving early detection.

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